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Ban Tobacco Displays say Parents Centres New Zealand Inc

Parents Centres New Zealand Inc say children must be protected from tobacco advertising, and are pleased the Government is continuing to consult on the display of tobacco products in shops.
Parents Centres New Zealand Inc say children must be protected from tobacco advertising, and are pleased the Government is continuing to consult on the display of tobacco products in shops. In addition we ask that retailers respect the support required by mothers to assist them in giving up smoking.

Associate Minister of Health Hon Tariana Turia has announced that further consultation will take place on options for removing tobacco products from display in retail outlets.

?Parents don't want their children to become smokers ? but they can't do it alone,? says Parents Centres New Zealand Chief Executive Viv Gurrey.

"Many pregnant women also face the challenges of giving up smoking ? we should support them in that choice. Research clearly shows the impact of smoking on both the mother and unborn child?

?Often cigarettes are displayed very close to discretionary spend items, sending a clear message to children that tobacco is just another product endorsed by adults. It's misleading and undermines the values many parents aim to communicate to their children.

?We know that children and adolescents who are frequently exposed to tobacco displays are more likely to experiment and start smoking.?

Gurrey says tobacco displays are just another way for the tobacco industry to advertise.

?Since conventional forms of tobacco advertising were banned, the tobacco industry has increased its focus on retail settings. Cigarette displays in retail outlets are a highly effective marketing tool. They create product awareness, reinforce brand imagery, provide subliminal enticement and encourage sales.?

Both Parents Centres and the Smokefree Coalition groups are urging the Government to carefully consider the evidence and make the right decision ? removing tobacco displays from shops.


For further information

Viv Gurrey, Parents Centres New Zealand Inc: 021 277 9029
Parents Centres NZ Inc is the primary provider of childbirth education in New Zealand employing over 100 childbirth educators and has the largest parenting based support network and infrastructure available to all parents in the community across 52 Centres nationwide.



Tobacco display facts

Cigarette displays =active marketing

? Cigarette displays in retail outlets are a highly effective marketing tool. They create product awareness, reinforce brand imagery, provide subliminal enticement and encourage sales.
? The 1990 Smoke-free Environments Act says tobacco advertising is pretty much anything used ?to encourage the use, notify the availability or promote the sale of any tobacco product or to promote smoking ?? Cigarette displays do exactly that.
? Studies in the 1990s found retail displays of cigarettes increase average tobacco sales by 12% to 28%. They are a causative factor in smoking uptake.

Cigarette displays affect children and people trying to quit

? Cigarette displays are a particular issue for children. Research shows displays ?normalise' cigarettes for children and trigger impulse purchases by what the tobacco industry calls ?learner smokers' ? our children!
? Cigarette displays also particularly affect people trying to quit smoking. They trigger impulse purchasing in those who are struggling with nicotine withdrawal.

Smoking kills. Ban cigarette retail displays

? The WHO says ?Tobacco is the second major cause of death in the world?. Cigarettes are highly addictive and highly carcinogenic.
? Tobacco industry documents from the 1960s show tobacco companies knew then that nicotine addiction is the main reason people continue smoking. A lawyer for Brown & Williamson said: ?Nicotine is addictive. We are, then, in the business of selling nicotine, an addictive drug.?
? Publicly, however, tobacco companies denied nicotine is addictive. Such an admission would undermine their stance that smoking is a matter of personal choice.

Cigarette displays are a highly effective marketing device

? Whilst the sale of other dangerous products such as guns, pharmaceuticals and industrial chemicals are highly regulated, cigarettes remain easily accessible and are openly advertised to the public, including children, through retail displays.
? The addictive nature and heavy death toll of tobacco requires government to take a more serious approach to regulating tobacco than currently exists.
? Current regulations are overly complicated, contrary to the intent of the legislation and badly implemented (eg. it is conservatively estimated that 61% of retail outlets are in breach of existing display regulations).
? A partial ban such as restricting the amount of promotion won't work. A complete ban is needed.

For further information, see:

www.protectourchildren.org.nz